Down the TBR Hole

Down the TBR Hole #1

While I was reading through the blogs I follow, I found a weekly post made by Lost in a Story and I thought it would be something fun between reviews.

Here’s how it works (taken from the original post):

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Now, I have lots of to-read shelves because I sort them from ?-2014 publication date, and then individual to-reads for 2015-present pub date. I’m going to start with the general to-read, anything published before 2015. I’m also going to go in order of date added, just because. It’s also going to be kind of hard, but I’m going to try to cross-check with my owned shelves and maybe do an unhaul sometime in the future.

want-to-read shelf as of May 27, 2018: 597

138398The Walking Dead, Vol. 1: Days Gone Bye

How many hours are in a day when you don’t spend half of them watching television?
When is the last time any of us REALLY worked to get something we wanted?
How long has it been since any of us
really NEEDED something that we WANTED?
The world we knew is gone.
The world of commerce and frivolous necessity has been replaced by a world of survival and responsibility.
An epidemic of apocalyptic proportions has swept the globe causing the dead to rise and feed on the living.
In a matter of months society has crumbled.
no government, no grocery stores, no mail delivery, no cable TV.
In a world ruled by the dead, we are forced to finally start living.

Verdict: Go

Yeah, this isn’t happening. I’ve tried too many times to read it and watch the show, but I just can’t get into it. I’m very picky about zombies and these just aren’t it.

 

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess227463

A vicious fifteen-year-old “droog” is the central character of this 1963 classic, whose stark terror was captured in Stanley Kubrick’s magnificent film of the same title.

In Anthony Burgess’s nightmare vision of the future, where criminals take over after dark, the story is told by the central character, Alex, who talks in a brutal invented slang that brilliantly renders his and his friends’ social pathology. A Clockwork Orange is a frightening fable about good and evil, and the meaning of human freedom. When the state undertakes to reform Alex—to “redeem” him—the novel asks, “At what cost?”

Verdict: Go, sadly

Another one I’ve tried and failed at reading. I think the biggest hurdle is the weird slang Burgess uses. How am I supposed to get into a book when i have to look up a word every other sentence?

 

 

54701984 by George Orwell

Among the seminal texts of the 20th century, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a rare work that grows more haunting as its futuristic purgatory becomes more real. Published in 1949, the book offers political satirist George Orwell’s nightmare vision of a totalitarian, bureaucratic world and one poor stiff’s attempt to find individuality. The brilliance of the novel is Orwell’s prescience of modern life–the ubiquity of television, the distortion of the language–and his ability to construct such a thorough version of hell. Required reading for students since it was published, it ranks among the most terrifying novels ever written.

Verdict: Keep

I’m going to keep for a few reasons. I do intend to read this *eventually*, but also, I own a copy that was discarded from my high school in 1984 with the little check-out card still inside. It’s kind of nostalgic, so I’m keeping it.

 

 

Picture1The Grim Grotto / The Penultimate Peril / The End by Lemony Snicket

The last volume of the fabulously popular A Series of Unfortunate Events series, in which the history of the Baudelaire orphans is brought to its end.

You are presumably looking at the back of this book, or the end of the end. The end of the end is the best place to begin the end, because if you read the end from the beginning of the beginning of the end to the end of the end of the end, you will arrive at the end of the end of your rope.

This book is the last in A Series of Unfortunate Events, and even if you braved the previous twelve volumes, you probably can’t stand such unpleasantries as a fearsome storm, a suspicious beverage, a herd of wild sheep, an enormous bird cage, and a truly haunting secret about the Baudelaire parents.

It has been my solemn occupation to complete the history of the Baudelaire orphans, and at last I am finished. You likely have some other occupation, so if I were you I would drop this book at once, so the end does not finish you.

With all due respect,

Lemony Snicket

Verdict: Keep

Truly, I will finish this series. Somehow, after all these years, I’ve never been spoiled for the ending of this series. I intend to finish the series before season 3 of the Netflix show airs, I swear!

Final tally
∴Start: 597
∴Go: 2
∴Keep: 4
∴Total: 595

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