Down the TBR Hole

Down the TBR Hole #8

While I was reading through the blogs I follow, I found a weekly post made by Lost in a Story and I thought it would be something fun between reviews.

Here’s how it works (taken from the original post):

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Now, I have lots of to-read shelves because I sort them from ?-2014 publication date, and then individual to-reads for 2015-present pub date. I’m going to start with the general to-read, anything published before 2015. I’m also going to go in order of date added, just because. It’s also going to be kind of hard, but I’m going to try to cross-check with my owned shelves and maybe do an unhaul sometime in the future.

want-to-read shelf as of July 15, 2018: 580 (apparently I added some somewhere)

1599142Blood Ties/Vickie Nelson Series 1-6 by Tanya Huff

Vicki Nelson, formerly of Toronto’s homicide unit and now a private detective, witnesses the first of many vicious attacks that are now plaguing the city of Toronto. As death follows unspeakable death, Vicki is forced to renew her tempestuous relationship with her former partner, Mike Celluci, to stop these forces of dark magic—along with another, unexpected ally…

Henry Fitzroy, the illegitimate son of King Henry VIII, has learned over the course of his long life how to blend with humans, how to deny the call for blood in his veins. Without him, Vicki and Mike would not survive the ancient force of chaos that has been unleashed upon the world—but in doing so, his identity may be exposed, and his life forfeit.

Verdict: Keep. 

I love the adaptation. It’s like the quintessential cop procedural with vampires and wizards and crazy stuff. Like Grimm but before Grimm was Grimm. I own a couple of the paperbacks, but I just haven’t gotten to them yet.

18144053The Museum of Extraordinary Things by Alice Hoffman

Coralie Sardie is the daughter of the sinister impresario behind The Museum of Extraordinary Things, a Coney Island boardwalk freak show that thrills the masses. An exceptional swimmer, Coralie appears as the Mermaid in her father’s “museum,” alongside performers like the Wolfman, the Butterfly Girl, and a one-hundred-year-old turtle. One night Coralie stumbles upon a striking young man taking pictures of moonlit trees in the woods off the Hudson River. The dashing photographer is Eddie Cohen, a Russian immigrant who has run away from his father’s Lower East Side Orthodox community and his job as a tailor’s apprentice. When Eddie photographs the devastation on the streets of New York following the infamous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, he becomes embroiled in the suspicious mystery behind a young woman’s disappearance and ignites the heart of Coralie.

Verdict: Keep. 

I have a friend that keeps telling me how good this is. I bought it because of the merm skeleton on the cover, if I’m being honest.

18490560Nobody is Ever Missing by Catherine Lacey

Without telling her family, Elyria takes a one-way flight to New Zealand, abruptly leaving her stable but unfulfilling life in Manhattan. As her husband scrambles to figure out what happened to her, Elyria hurtles into the unknown, testing fate by hitchhiking, tacitly being swept into the lives of strangers, and sleeping in fields, forests, and public parks.
Her risky and often surreal encounters with the people and wildlife of New Zealand propel Elyria deeper into her deteriorating mind. Haunted by her sister’s death and consumed by an inner violence, her growing rage remains so expertly concealed that those who meet her sense nothing unwell. This discord between her inner and outer reality leads her to another obsession: If her truest self is invisible and unknowable to others, is she even alive?
The risks Elyria takes on her journey are paralleled by the risks Catherine Lacey takes on the page. In urgent, spiraling prose she whittles away at the rage within Elyria and exposes the very real, very knowable anxiety of the human condition. And yet somehow Lacey manages to poke fun at her unrelenting self-consciousness, her high-stakes search for the dark heart of the self. In the spirit of Haruki Murakami and Amelia Gray, Nobody Is Ever Missing is full of mordant humor and uncanny insights, as Elyria waffles between obsession and numbness in the face of love, loss, danger, and self-knowledge.

Verdict: Keep, for now

This is a hard one. I reread the blurb and I’m intrigued, but also I’ve been kinda flakey on literary fiction and contemporary lately. I’ll keep it for now.

13023Alice in Wonderland by Jane Carruth (adapter) & Lewis Carroll

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (commonly shortened to Alice in Wonderland) is an 1865 novel written by English mathematician Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. It tells of a girl named Alice falling through a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lasting popularity with adults as well as with children. It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre. Its narrative course and structure, characters and imagery have been enormously influential in both popular culture and literature, especially in the fantasy genre.

Verdict: Go

This one is confusing me. I think I may have added it thinking it was an Alice reimagining (which I’m a complete sucker for), but from what I can see, it’s not, it’s just another/different adaptation of the original? I dunno. It’s going. Byeeeeee

803120Witch Child by Celia Rees

Enter the world of young Mary Newbury, a world where simply being different can cost a person her life. Hidden until now in the pages of her diary, Mary’s startling story begins in 1659, the year her beloved grandmother is hanged in the public square as a witch. Mary narrowly escapes a similar fate, only to face intolerance and new danger among the Puritans in the New World. How long can she hide her true identity? Will she ever find a place where her healing powers will not be feared?

Verdict: Keep?

I remember trying to read this as a kid. I think I owned it at some point? I’m on the fence about it, but I love Salem-esque witch stories and I don’t know what to dooooo.

-Final tally-
∴Start: 580
∴Go: 1
∴Keep: 9
∴Total: 579

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3 thoughts on “Down the TBR Hole #8

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